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Tuesday, August 26, 2014

"Hate"

I got the following comment this morning on the Robin Williams post: 

wow most of these comments are so venomous and hatefilled it makes me cringe and I bet most of you claim to be coos [good] christians. I'm so ashamed of all of you, try operating thru love and compassion. nobody knows what this person suffered thru and he was far more humanitarian than any of you hatemongers.

I replied:

Loving anonymous person --
One person's hatemonger is another person's truth teller.

And, after all, what are you doing here but being judgmental and condemnatory -- and hateful -- yourself?

By the way, I don't call myself a good Christian. I'm somewhere between atheist and agnostic. But it sure sounds to me as if you're "hatemongering" against Christians.

"Hate" is an interesting term. Liberals love to ascribe it as the motivating force behind anyone guilty of pattern recognition. This thought process seems to involve a lot of projection. I've known a lot of liberals in my life, and also a lot of conservatives. (I grew up surrounded by liberals.) And it's always seemed to me that most of the conservatives I've known have been polite and well-mannered, whereas the liberals were much more jeering, sneering, posturing, bilious types. There are certainly exceptions, but in my experience, they are usually just that.

(I'd bet good money that commenter is a liberal.)

To call someone a "hater" is an argument of last resort. It's a little like when an argument about affirmative action, race, and IQ breaks out and the liberal calls his opponent a "Nazi," or a "racist." Name-calling is what you do when you don't have the facts on your side. It's essentially an admission that you've lost the argument, and an attempt to intimidate your opponent into shamed silence. (Shame on you, for bringing up hate facts like that.)

Fortunately, more and more people seem to be catching on to this game. 

8 comments:

World_War_Me said...

I love commentaries such as this. IMO, people should start embracing their hate. It's such a refreshing, non-conformist concept these days

You might enjoy this piece, too:

"Hatred Shall Set You Free"
http://mister-mean-spirited.blogspot.com/2014/05/hatred-shall-set-you-free.html

PS Thank you for your work; I enjoy your blog.

John Craig said...


World War -
Thank YOU.

I just spent about half an hour browsing through that blog. It's excellent, and in its own way, very reassuring. If all you're exposed to is sappy let's-hold-hands- and- sing-Kumbaya rhetoric, after a while, you begin to wonder if there's something wrong with you for thinking forbidden thoughts. A half hour with Mr. Mean Spirited was actually more "uplifting" than time with anybody TRYING to be uplifting could be.

Anonymous said...

I was thinking about the Robin Williams posts and comments.

I think a lot of the negativity was due to the fact that his comedy was not funny but everyone was laughing.

Was everybody pretending? If the whole crowd is laughing maybe I should laugh...but couldn't.

John Craig said...

Anon --
I felt exactly the same way.

What you just said reminded me of being in college, and listening to the professors make weak, lame jokes, and having the entire titter at them. It always seemed to me that people laughed because they thought they were supposed to laugh, and because they wanted to show they were sophisticated and got the joke, not because the joke slated them. Real laughter is involuntary. That's why when people say "I lactually laughed out loud in the privacy of my own room," because that proves something really IS funny. Contrast that to the number of times people write "lol" while texting when they're obviously not laughing out loud, and you get a sense of the difference between truly funny humor and the precious, lame variety.

In those professor's classrooms, as in Robin Williams' comedy shows, it was as if someone was holding up a sign saying, "Laugh," and the audience dutifully obliged.

Anonymous said...

Can't people just let Robin Williams posts rest in peace?

John Craig said...

Anon --
Good one.

Glen Filthie said...

There is the element of hypocrisy here too. This guy is basically admonishing you for making moral and ethical judgements - and finishes off by making a moral and ethical judgement.

I guess it is OK to pass moral and ethical judgement on people as long as it is politically correct and doesn't offend liberals...and that is probably your sin: Williams was a typically Hollywood lefty moron and a social failure once the props and PR hype fell away.

John Craig said...

Glen --
Exactly.