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Friday, August 28, 2015

Race relations in a nutshell


(Vester Flanagan and Alison Parker, whom he murdered)

A NY Post article today listed some of the examples of behavior by whites which Vester Flanagan deemed racist:

“We would say stuff like, ‘The reporter’s out in the field.’ And [Flanagan] would look at us and say, ‘What are you saying, cotton fields? That’s racist,’ ” [cameraman Trevor] Fair recounted….

Flanagan assumed everything was a jab this race, even when a manager brought in watermelon for all employees.

“Of course, he thought that was racist. He was like, ‘You’re doing that because of me.’ No, the general manager brought in watermelon for the entire news team. He’s like, ‘Nope, this is out for me. You guys are calling me out because I’m black.’ ”

Flanagan even declared that ­7-Eleven was racist because it sold watermelon-flavored Slurpees.


Alison Parker once said within earshot of Flanagan that she would be "swinging by" a certain location and Flanagan evidently complained that that was racist, presumably because he thought she was making a reference to monkeys swinging in trees.

Liberals will dismiss all this as the rantings of a lone loon.

But was Flanagan's thought process rally all that different from the politically correct norm? For example, Janet Napolitano, President of the prestigious University of California, has been training professors to avoid "microaggressions" like describing America as the "land of opportunity," since that implies that people of color fail based on merit.

Other examples of "microaggressions" include such well intentioned comments as describing America as a melting pot; stating that there is only one race, the human race; and using "he" as a generic pronoun for all people.

Or think of the positions that the Black Lives Matter movement takes. Their core belief seems to be that blacks are in constant danger from whites, especially white cops. To this day they still insist, despite all evidence to the contrary, that Michael Brown was an innocent victim. And when someone -- like Democratic Presidential candidate Martin O'Malley -- says that all lives matter, the BLM crowd becomes enraged and demands an apology.

And the mainstream media -- i.e., the respectable media -- continues to push the narrative that blacks are at risk from whites, when the opposite is far more true. (When blacks commit violence, they choose whites as their victims 47.7% of the time, as opposed to whites choosing black victims only 3.9% of the time.)

In this atmosphere, is it all that surprising that a hothouse flower like Vester Flanagan would bloom? Flanagan wasn't so much an anomaly as a result of the agenda pushed by Napolitano and BLM and the NY Times and their ilk. When you goad a borderline personality like Flanagan on with nonstop talk about white racism, eventually he will see nothing but racism.

Of course, when a Vester Flanagan explodes and murders whites, it's never treated as a racial crime. It's only mentioned -- as the White House chose to do yesterday -- as an example of why we need more gun control.

But, more and more people seem to be waking up to the hypocrisy. They realize they're being sold a bill of goods, and are getting sick of it.

And, more than anything else, it's that false narrative that actually causes anti-black feelings. It's like having a roommate with a narcissistic personality: you don't end up resenting him because of his annoying little habits so much as because of his overwhelming hypocrisy.

23 comments:

Mark Caplan said...

Flanagan even declared that ­7-Eleven was racist because it sold watermelon-flavored Slurpees.

Another racial stereotype is that African Americans are irresistibly drawn to gambling, and, in particular, craps. The name 7-Eleven I assume refers to that dice game, and therefore is racist.

Your juxtaposition of Vester Lee Flanagan's hideous mugshot alongside Alison Parker's adorable face reminded me that in Between the World and Me author Ta-Nehisi Coates repeated about 30 times his view that "black is beautiful" or "black bodies are beautiful."

John Craig said...

Mark --
Ha, yes, their very name is racist.

I'd like to take credit for that juxtaposition but that combined picture was just copied from the NY Post. They did seem to be engaging in a little bit of photographic editorializing there.

Quartermain said...

Too many people throw the word 'racist' around too much.

The truth is that if you act and live contemptibly, the consequences will be bad.

That is not 'racism' that is reality.

John Craig said...

Allan --
Haven't you ever heard of "hate facts"?

Quartermain said...

Allan --
Haven't you ever heard of "hate facts"?

Sure have, I thought I was spouting one.

Anyway here are some from Pastor Manning.

John Craig said...

Allan --
Not sure who came up with the phrase "hate facts" first, I first read it on Steve Sailer, but it does describe the current environment perfectly.

mark said...

I still think the younger, thinner Vester Flanagan looked like a small town newsman that was up for bigger and better things. I also like watermelon so perhaps you should be suspicious of my judgement. TV is such a visual medium that he probably thought, I look better than some of those white folks so why am I not Lester Holt? A straight black guy might have appreciated some of the qualities of Alison Parker even if he didn't like being superseded by her. Vester was stranger than he realized because of a lack of self awareness of himself and how straight people view the world. It actually is kind of sad. Also, I am going to have to think about what to take to the next company pot luck. Fried chicken is out but what about nachos?

John Craig said...

Mark --
The more I think about it, the more Vester strikes me as an Aspie with other issues, not a sociopath. a sociopath would have been successful at charming others, t least at first; vested was unable to do this. And as you point out, his lack of self-awareness was total. He was unable to take blame for anything (this is also a narcissistic/sociopathic trait). And he couldn't manage to see anything from anyone else's point of view.

Nachos? Probably safe, unless you have a Hispanic version of Vester working there.

High Arka said...

His mistake was in speaking up so often. If he'd just kept a list of all of these microaggressions, he could have presented them to a lawyer as evidence of "years of abuse" at his job, sued the station, and retired. 'Course, that version of the plan would've involved more foresight than immediately "calling people out" every time he perceived a problem.

I wonder...if TWMNBN reorganized society so that whites had the kinds of legal and financial privileges as blacks, would the white community start to produce these kinds of people? And would the black community start to produce its own reverse-Dolezals?

John Craig said...

High Arka --
That plan wold not only have involved more foresight, but more inhibitions as well, and Flanagan didn't have a lot of self-control.

I'd say the white community already has its share of frivolous lawsuit-happy types. They don't interpret every statement as racist code, but there are definitely people who will take advantage of every nook and cranny of the law. As far as the black community producing its own who pass, there's actually been a long tradition of that among the octoroons and occasionally even quadroons. But it would be basically impossible for anyone who's anything more than a quarter black to pass, so it's not an issue which arises. I actually have one of those faces and builds which could pass for a lot of things, and it's occurred to me that I could take advantage, though I never have.

(PS -- Note the clever way I've avoided any mention of TWMNBN, thus illustrating the truth of that phrase.)

High Arka said...

Suppose that in twenty years, a black person could go into an all-night genetic surgery center and become white-skinned for only $79.99--but be otherwise exactly like they were before. Or that they could do only their face and hands for $29.99. Would some of them, then, get that surgery, then sue Harvard for engaging in racism by denying admission to a white person? And/or get a job with the ADL, which might by then be heavily invested in (avowedly) pro-white causes?

John Craig said...

High Arka --
Interesting scenario. I suppose it's theoretically possible. Though I suspect before we would get to the point where white people can sue for discrimination, affirmative action would be abolished. And there are a lot of things beside the face and hands that are giveaways of race. (I realize, you're speaking theoretically.)

Quartermain said...

Here's an article from Lew Rockwell with a take on Vester Lee Flanagan and the diabolical trend he is a part of:

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2015/08/william-norman-grigg/social-justice-avenger/

Quartermain said...

"Suppose that in twenty years, a black person could go into an all-night genetic surgery center and become white-skinned"

Eighty four years ago, George Schuyler wrote a book about that possibility:

http://schuyleriana.blogspot.com/2006/10/black-no-more-novel.html

John Craig said...

Allan --
The Rockwell article captures the current atmosphere well.

There was a famous book, "Black Like Me," written by John Howard Griffin, and published in 1961, about a white man who disguised himself as a black man and traveled through the South. He talked about the "hate stares" he received from white people, and how difficult it was. My guess is that he exaggerated a bit in order to sell books and make his case, but it WAS a different time then. Now it seems to be the opposite. Whites are generally fearful of blacks, but don't dare mention that for fear of being accused of racism.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the post. You are right and I am wrong.

-birdie

John Craig said...

Birdie --
That wasn't why I put it up, but thank you.

Anonymous said...

I know - what I assumed was the case about the killer was off track on my end. Good post.

-birdie

Lucian Lafayette said...

A number of years ago the actions of Vester Flannigan would have resulted in some sort of investigations but because he held two of the special class trump cards, “racism” and “homophobia”, he was allowed to get away with a lot of aberrant behavior. Had he been a white, heterosexual, Christian guy he most likely would have been institutionalized, put on a terrorist watch list, and denounced by the Southern Poverty Law center a decade ago. Well, the terrorist watch list might be a little too far but you get the point.

Political correctness is a twisted view of reality and perceptions of reality can be very powerful. Thomas Sowell began to explore the idea of differing views of what should have been objective facts in his book “A Conflict of Visions” and this has become one of the major themes of his life’s work. Two supposedly rational people can look at what should be an objective set of facts, draw dramatically different conclusions and act accordingly. Naturally, since my set of filters puts me in what Sowell calls the Constrained Vision (humans naturally selfish, American Revolution good, French Revolution bad, limited government good, etc.) I feel that the other side of the spectrum is wrong no matter how many times they try to enforce their opinions on me by government action.

Finally, it is interesting to note that this country was settled by very different groups of people. Many of the movers and shakers today can be traced to the early Puritans. To paraphrase the journalist Whitelaw Reid from the early twentieth century, The Puritans didn’t come to the new world for religious freedom, they came to America to impose their vision of reality on everyone else. The irreligious or atheistic progressives and the philosophical children of The Puritans: they are driven to impose their view of the world on everyone else regardless of the cost.

John Craig said...

Luke --
Couldn't agree with you more about the trump cards. And I agree that political correctness is mostly just factual incorrectness, or, at the very least, an incomplete set of facts. (We must ignore that which is not acceptable to accept as reality.)

But while I'm generally a fan of Sowell's, I'm not so sure that the story of two rational people looking at the same set of facts can draw dramatically different conclusions, at least as a description of the hot button issues in our society today. Facts are facts, and there should be no misinterpreting them. If you're referring to possible course of action about, for instance, what should we do to end poverty, sure, there's plenty of room for debate. But as far as whether, for instance, Alison Parker was being racist when she said she was going to "swing by" a certain location, there's not much room for argument. And more and more the debates that seem to dominate public discourse today have to do with, say, whether or not Michael Brown was an innocent victim or whether he brought his own fate upon himself. And I just don't see two objective people coming to different conclusions about that.

You're absolutely right about why the Puritans came here. But I don't see their descendants as holding the reins of power so much anymore. forty years ago, maybe. But now, the opinion makers, the censors, and those who dominate the financial markets seem increasingly to be Jewish.

Quartermain said...

I define Political Correctness as the thesis that only White men can take a joke or criticism.

Quartermain said...

Here is Selwyn Duke's take:

http://americanprophet.org//Liberalism-Created-the-WDBJ-Killer-columns_Duke_1934.htm

John Craig said...

Allan --
Thanks. He basically said the same thing I did, but he said it better.